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The Wines

2005 Bertrand Ambroise Bourgogne Rouge

  •     88 Wine Advocate #171

The 2005 Bourgogne is amazingly dark in color, smells and tastes of raw blackberries and graphite, saturates the palate with formidable, bitter-sweet
intensity of fruit, and finishes firmly with persistent flavors of blackberry and roasted meat. Amboise characterized this year’s fruit as consisting of “perfect berries, solid and well-structured” from which he concluded it should all be de-stemmed and a cautious approach taken to extraction. But caution is relative. Bertrand Ambroise certainly vinifies with a fanatic dedication to quality, but also with no concessions to the faint of heart, and his formidably tannic 2005s will strike some tasters as hyper-concentrated and flirting with over-extraction. Perhaps a bit more refinement and differentiation might have been achieved with a less robust and woody approach? Ambroise works largely with 400-liter barrels in an effort to preserve fruit by diminishing the surface-to-volume ratio and thus the flavoring effects of new wood, but I cannot claim that I would have recognized that fact in the wines themselves. – David Schildknecht

  • 2005 Bertrand Ambroise Beaune Perrieres

    (90-91) Wine Advocate #171

The 2005 Bourgogne is amazingly dark in color, smells and tastes of raw blackberries and graphite, saturates the palate with formidable, bitter-sweet intensity of fruit, and finishes firmly with persistent flavors of blackberry and roasted meat. Amboise characterized this year’s fruit as consisting of “perfect berries, solid and well-structured” from which he concluded it should all be de-stemmed and a cautious approach taken to extraction. But caution is relative. Bertrand Ambroise certainly vinifies with a fanatic dedication to quality, but also with no concessions to the faint of heart, and his formidably tannic 2005s will strike some tasters as hyper-concentrated and flirting with over-extraction. Perhaps a bit more refinement and differentiation might have been achieved with a less robust and woody approach? Ambroise works largely with 400-liter barrels in an effort to preserve fruit by diminishing the surface-to-volume ratio and thus the flavoring effects of new wood, but I cannot claim that I would have recognized that fact in the wines themselves. — David Schildknecht

 

  • 2005 Bertrand Ambroise Bourgogne Pinot Noir Cuvee Vieilles Vignes

    (88-89) Wine Advocate #171

The 2005 Bourgogne is amazingly dark in color, smells and tastes of raw blackberries and graphite, saturates the palate with formidable, bitter-sweet intensity of fruit, and finishes firmly with persistent flavors of blackberry and roasted meat. Amboise characterized this year’s fruit as consisting of “perfect berries, solid and well-structured” from which he concluded it should all be de-stemmed and a cautious approach taken to extraction. But caution is relative. Bertrand Ambroise certainly vinifies with a fanatic dedication to quality, but also with no concessions to the faint of heart, and his formidably tannic 2005s will strike some tasters as hyper-concentrated and flirting with over-extraction. Perhaps a bit more refinement and differentiation might have been achieved with a less robust and woody approach? Ambroise works largely with 400-liter barrels in an effort to preserve fruit by diminishing the surface-to-volume ratio and thus the flavoring effects of new wood, but I cannot claim that I would have recognized that fact in the wines themselves.

  • 2005 Bertrand Ambroise Clos Vougeot

    (92-93) Wine Advocate #171

The Ambroise 2005 Clos Vougeot – around 75 cases worth, from a parcel near Grands Echezeaux – smells of black currant and charred meat. To these elements are added notes of walnut liqueur and brine-like as well as stony expressions of minerality. This has a sense of creaminess and a focus of fruit in the finish when compared with many of the overtly structured, brashly-concentrated wines in this year’s collection, but there is still a certain smoky, pungent severity here. Nor is this any less powerful than other of those wines. I would look to cellar it for at least 8-10 years. Amboise characterized this year’s fruit as consisting of “perfect berries, solid and well-structured” from which he concluded it should all be de-stemmed and a cautious approach taken to extraction. But caution is relative. Bertrand Ambroise certainly vinifies with a fanatic dedication to quality, but also with no concessions to the faint of heart, and his formidably tannic 2005s will strike some tasters as hyper-concentrated and flirting with over-extraction. Perhaps a bit more refinement and differentiation might have been achieved with a less robust and woody approach? Ambroise works largely with 400-liter barrels in an effort to preserve fruit by diminishing the surface-to-volume ratio and thus the flavoring effects of new wood, but I cannot claim that I would have recognized that fact in the wines themselves. – David Schildknecht

  • 2005 Bertrand Ambroise Corton Rognet

    (93-94) Wine Advocate #171

Sandalwood, machine oil, blackberry and cassis rise from the glass of 2005 Corton Rognets. In the mouth, this exhibits admirable purity and clarity of raw black fruits, low-toned charred meat, chalk, salt and wet stone minerality. Formidably yet finely tannic, this darkly-shaded and multi-layered wine really mines the mineral profundity of Corton and epitomizes the raw fruit intensity of which the vintage is capable. The stout of heart should lock this away for a decade or more. Amboise characterized this year’s fruit as consisting of “perfect berries, solid and well-structured” from which he concluded it should all be de-stemmed and a cautious approach taken to extraction. But caution is relative. Bertrand Ambroise certainly vinifies with a fanatic dedication to quality, but also with no concessions to the faint of heart, and his formidably tannic 2005s will strike some tasters as hyper-concentrated and flirting with over-extraction. Perhaps a bit more refinement and differentiation might have been achieved with a less robust and woody approach? Ambroise works largely with 400-liter barrels in an effort to preserve fruit by diminishing the surface-to-volume ratio and thus the flavoring effects of new wood, but I cannot claim that I would have recognized that fact in the wines themselves. – David Schildknecht

  •  2005 Bertrand Ambroise Cote de Nuits Villages

line-height: normal” class=”MsoNormal”>    (87-88) Wine Advocate #171

Ambroise’s 2005 Cote de Nuits-Villages originates just below Mugnier’s Clos de la Marechale and the Clos de l’Arlot. Cooked blackberry and blackcurrant along with a gamey meatiness in the nose lead to a creamy, richly-fruited palate with salt and pencil lead mineral suggestions. The finish is powerful and persistently gamey as well as rather severe in its bitterness of fruit concentration. Amboise characterized this year’s fruit as consisting of “perfect berries, solid and well-structured” from which he concluded it should all be de-stemmed and a cautious approach taken to extraction. But caution is relative. Bertrand Ambroise certainly vinifies with a fanatic dedication to quality, but also with no concessions to the faint of heart, and his formidably tannic 2005s will strike some tasters as hyper-concentrated and flirting with over-extraction. Perhaps a bit more refinement and differentiation might have been achieved with a less robust and woody approach? Ambroise works largely with 400-liter barrels in an effort to preserve fruit by diminishing the surface-to-volume ratio and thus the flavoring effects of new wood, but I cannot claim that I would have recognized that fact in the wines themselves

  •  2005 Bertrand Ambroise Echezeaux

    (91-92) Wine Advocate #171

The wood elements here dovetail effectively with the fruit. From fruit he purchases, originating in the Champs Traversins and Poulailleres sections of the appellation, Ambroise’s 2005 Echezeaux smells of black raspberry mingled with bitter-sweet floral notes and high-toned almond and cherry distillate. Vanilla and brown spices complement the fruit on the palate, where this is relaxed and open compared to most of Ambroise’s wines. An abundance of pure, raw berry fruit and tactile vividness of cinnamon and allspice informs the finish. This goes down easier and should mature more rapidly than most of the Ambroise 2005 crus. Amboise characterized this year’s fruit as consisting of “perfect berries, solid and well-structured” from which he concluded it should all be de-stemmed and a cautious approach taken to extraction. But caution is relative. Bertrand Ambroise certainly vinifies with a fanatic dedication to quality, but also with no concessions to the faint of heart, and his formidably tannic 2005s will strike some tasters as hyper-concentrated and flirting with over-extraction. Perhaps a bit more refinement and differentiation might have been achieved with a less robust and woody approach? Ambroise works largely with 400-liter barrels in an effort to preserve fruit by diminishing the surface-to-volume ratio and thus the flavoring effects of new wood, but I cannot claim that I would have recognized that fact in the wines themselves. – David Schildknecht

  • 2005 Bertrand Ambroise Nuits St Georges Les Argilières

   (92-93) Wine Advocate #171

The 2005 Nuits-St.-Georges Clos des Argillieres generates intense aromas and flavors of bitter-sweet blackberry, mulberry, herbs and dark chocolate. A rich palate offers more sweetness of black fruit than the other Nuits-St.-George bottlings in this year’s collection, with formidable, firm, yet supportive rather than obtrusive tannins. A good shaking reveals distilled black and blue fruit and herbal essences. For all of this wines brash black fruit bitterness and tartness and for all of its sheer density and abundance of tannin, it nevertheless displays a comforting tendency toward creaminess of texture. It finishes with grip and intensity but no roughness, and it would benefit from up to a decade in one’s cellar. Amboise characterized this year’s fruit as consisting of “perfect berries, solid and well-structured” from which he concluded it should all be de-stemmed and a cautious approach taken to extraction. But caution is relative. Bertrand Ambroise certainly vinifies with a fanatic dedication to quality, but also with no concessions to the faint of heart, and his formidably tannic 2005s will strike some tasters as hyper-concentrated and flirting with over-extraction. Perhaps a bit more refinement and differentiation might have been achieved with a less robust and woody approach? Ambroise works largely with 400-liter barrels in an effort to preserve fruit by diminishing the surface-to-volume ratio and thus the flavoring effects of new wood, but I cannot claim that I would have recognized that fact in the wines themselves. – David Schildknecht

  •  2005 Bertrand Ambroise Nuits St Georges Les Vaucrains

    (91-92) Wine Advocate #171

Pitch-dark , the 2005 Nuits-St.-Georges Les Vaucrains displays aromas of ripe black fruits, toasted nuts, machine oil, and wet stones. Soy, bitter dark chocolate, roasted portabello and resin on the palate add to the impression of complexity, concentration and darkness conveyed by this very serious wine. The intensity of the finish wrung me out. But fun to drink? Perhaps in another ten years. Amboise characterized this year’s fruit as consisting of “perfect berries, solid and well-structured” from which he concluded it should all be de-stemmed and a cautious approach taken to extraction. But caution is relative. Bertrand Ambroise certainly vinifies with a fanatic dedication to quality, but also with no concessions to the faint of heart, and his formidably tannic 2005s will strike some tasters as hyper-concentrated and flirting with over-extraction. Perhaps a bit more refinement and differentiation might have been achieved with a less robust and woody approach? Ambroise works largely with 400-liter barrels in an effort to preserve fruit by diminishing the surface-to-volume ratio and thus the flavoring effects of new wood, but I cannot claim that I would have recognized that fact in the wines themselves.

  •  2005 Bertrand Ambroise Nuits St Georges Vieilles Vignes

    (91-92) Wine Advocate #171

Parcels situated below Les St.-Georges and Caille inform Ambroise’s 2005 Nuits-St.-Georges Vieilles Vignes. With sweeter blackberry aromas and flavors, and a somewhat richer, gentler initial palate impression than most of the Ambroise 2005s, this offers complementary elements of black chocolate, coconut, and singed meat. Still amazingly dark and powerful, this Pinot packs a rolling block of a finish. More formidable than
loveable today, it appears to need 5-7 years before even justifying re-inspection. (Then again, I am tempted to say “drink it before it drinks you!”) Amboise characterized this year’s fruit as consisting of “perfect berries, solid and well-structured” from which he concluded it should all be de-stemmed and a cautious approach taken to extraction. But caution is relative. Bertrand Ambroise certainly vinifies with a fanatic dedication to quality, but also with no concessions to the faint of heart, and his formidably tannic 2005s will strike some tasters as hyper-concentrated and flirting with over-extraction. Perhaps a bit more refinement and differentiation might have been achieved with a less robust and woody approach? Ambroise works largely with 400-liter barrels in an effort to preserve fruit by diminishing the surface-to-volume ratio and thus the flavoring effects of new wood, but I cannot claim that I would have recognized that fact in the wines themselves. – David Schildknecht

  • 2005 Bertrand Ambroise Nuits St Georges

    (88-89) Wine Advocate #171

From sites in both Premeaux-Prissey and around Nuits-St.-Georges itself, the Ambroise 2005 Nuits-St.-Georges offers yet another formidable combination of smoky meatiness with bitter black fruits, its severity accentuated by distinctly resinous and tannic notes of new wood. Unyieldingly firm in texture, this finishes with a brash intensity of raw black cherry and blackberry, resin and spice. The tannins surely demand 3-5 years in bottle just to reveal the wine’s true colors. Amboise characterized this year’s fruit as consisting of “perfect berries, solid and well-structured” from which he concluded it should all be de-stemmed and a cautious approach taken to extraction. But caution is relative. Bertrand Ambroise certainly vinifies with a fanatic dedication to quality, but also with no concessions to the faint of heart, and his formidably tannic 2005s will strike some tasters as hyper-concentrated and flirting with over-extraction. Perhaps a bit more refinement and differentiation might have been achieved with a less robust and woody approach? Ambroise works largely with 400-liter barrels in an effort to preserve fruit by diminishing the surface-to-volume ratio and thus the flavoring effects of new wood, but I cannot claim that I would have recognized that fact in the wines themselves. – David Schildknecht

  •  2005 Bertrand Ambroise Nuits St Georges Aux Cras

    (90-91) Wine Advocate #171

The 2005 Nuits-St.-Georges Aux Cras displays smoke, charred meat and bitter black fruits in the by now familiar Ambroise 2005 mold, approaching hyper-concentration. To that must be added in this instance a bit more overt woodiness and a stony, chalky mineral character appropriate to the site and formidable in its own right. This grips hard enough to perform a tonsillectomy. Time may temper it, but in that case, I suspect one must reckon with at least 5-7 years to make any significant impact. Amboise characterized this year’s fruit as consisting of “perfect berries, solid and well-structured” from which he concluded it should all be de-stemmed and a cautious approach taken to extraction. But caution is relative. Bertrand Ambroise certainly vinifies with a fanatic dedication to quality, but also with no concessions to the faint of heart, and his formidably tannic 2005s will strike some tasters as hyper-concentrated and flirting with over-extraction. Perhaps a bit more refinement and differentiation might have been achieved with a less robust and woody approach? Ambroise works largely with 400-liter barrels in an effort to preserve fruit by diminishing the surface-to-volume ratio and thus the flavoring effects of new wood, but I cannot claim that I would have recognized that fact in the wines themselves.-

  • 2005 Bertrand Ambroise Nuits St Georges Rue de Chaux

    (90-91) Wine Advocate #171

The 2005 Nuits-St.-Georges Rue de Chaux smells of concentrated black currant and sweet-and-smoky machine oil, mounts a massive onslaught on the palate of intense, tart black currant, blackberry and huckleberry and finishes with if anything yet more severity than the village vieilles vignes bottling. Charred meat, cigar ash, bitter-sweet herbs, tart black fruit, salt and resin pile on in a powerful finish. Amboise characterized this year’s fruit as consisting of “perfect berries, solid and well-structured” from which he concluded it should all be de-stemmed and a cautious approach taken to extraction. But caution is relative. Bertrand Ambroise certainly vinifies with a fanatic dedication to quality, but also with no concessions to the faint of heart, and his formidably tannic 2005s will strike some tasters as hyper-concentrated and flirting with over-extraction. Perhaps a bit more refinement and differentiation might have been achieved with a less robust and woody approach? Ambroise works largely with 400-liter barrels in an effort to preserve fruit by diminishing the surface-to-volume ratio and thus the flavoring effects of new wood, but I cannot claim that I would have recognized that fact in the wines themselves. – David Schildknecht

  • 2005 Bertrand Ambroise Vosne Romanee

    (90-91) Wine Advocate #171

A 2005 Vosne Romanee exudes black cherry and cherry distillate, wood smoke, and charred meats. Black fruit, game, and grilled meat intensity on the palate is met by salty mineral traces and resinous hints of new wood. Tart, salty, smoky, and bitter-sweet, this wine’s resemblance to the Malconsorts and La Tache that grow below it is surely not coincidental. But Ambroise also appears to approach its vinification as if it were grand cru. Amboise characterized this year’s fruit as consisting of “perfect berries, solid and well-structured” from which he concluded it should all be de-stemmed and a cautious approach taken to extraction. But caution is relative. Bertrand Ambroise certainly vinifies with a fanatic dedication to quality, but also with no concessions to the faint of heart, and his formidably tannic 2005s will strike some tasters as hyper-concentrated and flirting with over-extraction. Perhaps a bit more refinement and differentiation might have been achieved with a less robust and woody approach? Ambroise works largely with 400-liter barrels in an effort to preserve fruit by diminishing the surface-to-volume ratio and thus the flavoring effects of new wood, but I cannot claim that I would have recognized that fact in the wines themselves.

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Region:
Bourgogne – Cote de Nuit

Contact : AMBROISE Bertrand

Adresse : Rue de l'Eglise

Code postal : 21700

Ville : PREMEAUX-PRISSEY